4 min read

A design application by Aristocrat Technologies Australia Pty Limited (Aristocrat) for a bank of gaming machines has been refused because the representations were inconsistent with the product name for the design.  The decision shows that products made of assembled components must be carefully illustrated or run the risk of refusal.

Key takeaways

  • Components of products must be shown connected together in assembled form to be registered as a single product
  • Expert evidence may be of little use during prosecution of design applications
  • Arguments in favour of registration of a design based on previous registrations of similar designs are unlikely to succeed

Background

Aristocrat filed design application AU 201816709 for a “bank of gaming machines” (the Design) in relation to four gaming machines arranged in pairs back to back, as shown below.

During formalities examination, the Design was objected to for not showing the named product – a bank of gaming machines – in a “fully assembled” state because the gaming machines were spaced apart from each other in the representations.  For this reason, the Design was not in relation to a single product, but four separate gaming machines.

Aristocrat unsuccessfully argued that there was a single product – the “bank” of gaming machines.  As the objection was maintained, Aristocrat sought a hearing before a Delegate of the Registrar of Designs (the Delegate) to overcome the formalities objection.

Arguments

Aristocrat submitted evidence from a long time employee, Mr Attwood, asserting that it was common to install and replace gaming machines in groups or “banks”.  The representations illustrated this type of bank.

Aristocrat further submitted that the bank was a “complex product” under the Designs Act 2013 (the Act), which enabled designs for separately made components of a complex product to be registered. In this case, the individual gaming machines were separately made components of the bank, being a “complex product” and so were registrable.

Aristocrat also submitted that the bank could be a “kit”, which may be assembled by an end user.  The Act permitted the registration of designs for kits.

Aristocrat further submitted that the Designs Office had previously registered designs for banks of gaming machines.  Accordingly, the Design should also be registered for consistency in decision making by the Designs Office.

Decision

The Delegate cast doubt on the usefulness of the Attwood’s evidence.  Formalities examination did not require any consideration of an informed user, as represented by Mr Attwood.  Also, Mr Attwood was not independent, being an employee of Aristocrat. 

The Delegate then considered the definitions in the Act for the terms “product”, “complex product” and “kit”. 

The Delegate noted that the definition of “complex product” states that it must be capable of disassembly and re-assembly.  This implied that a complex product must be an assembly of its component parts.  Based on the ordinary meaning of “assembly”, the Delegate held that there must be some physical connection between the component parts. 

However, in the Design, none of the gaming machines were physically connected.  Accordingly, the bank of gaming machines was not in an assembled form and so did not show a complex product.

Aristocrat conceded that the gaming machines were not physically connected in the bank.  Aristocrat argued that they were in fact connected by electronic connections hidden from view and thus were not shown in the representations. 

The Delegate rejected that this argument as it assumed that a complex product was shown in the representations when this was not the case. 

The Delegate also rejected that the hidden connections should be read into the representations.  Such an approach was speculative as there was not any detail of those connections and it would render the scope of the design registration unclear.

The Delegate further rejected that the Design could be a registrable kit.  The definition of “kit” was qualified by the requirement that it is only taken to be a product “when assembled”.  Since the Design did not show the bank of gaming machines as assembled, the Design failed to meet this definition.

Finally, the Delegate agreed that there should be consistency in decisions made by the Designs Office, but said that each design application must be considered on its own merits.  The existence of similar registrations does not override the correct application of the Act and there was a small sample of prior registrations cited by Aristocrat.

Accordingly, the Delegate found that the representations did not illustrate a single product, being a bank of gaming machines.  Instead the Design showed four separate gaming machines and thus multiple designs.  Consequently, the Delegate refused to register the Design because Aristocrat had the opportunity to pay the extra official fees for the additional designs but chose not to do so.

Significance

The decision illustrates that care must be taken when preparing representations for a design that it shows a “product” within the definitions of the Act.  In this instance, the apparent lack of connections between the gaming machines was fatal to the registration of the Design.

The decision also illustrates that expert evidence may be of little assistance during formalities examination.  Also, arguments in favour of registration based on previously registered designs have little persuasive merit and are unlikely to succeed.

Authored by Andrew Lowe and Allira Hudson-Gofers

1 min read

Following on from our article of 4 September 2020, Australian Designs – Draft Bill now released, we advise that the Designs Amendment (Advisory Council on Intellectual Property Response) Bill 2020 (the Bill) was recently passed by both houses of Parliament and will soon be presented to the Governor General for Royal Assent.

On the day after Royal Assent, the amendments set out in Schedule 7, Parts 1 and 2 of the Bill will commence. These items relate to changes to clarify the legal standard used for the assessment of design infringement and registration, and the circumstances in which a design can be revoked. Their immediate commencement will realise the benefits of these changes as soon as possible.

The rest of the Bill, including the introduction of a long-awaited grace period (Schedule 1, Part 1 of the Bill), will commence 6 months after the date of Royal Assent.

Further information about the changes, including the commencement details, is available on the IP Australia website.

Authored by Allira Hudson-Gofers

4 min read

FemTech is surging around the world with new start-ups and technology entering the marketplace every day, but what’s going on Down Under?

Need for FemTech

As of June 2019, just over half of Australia’s population faced complicated genetic, physiological and hormonal factors making them prone to and more severely affected by certain conditions in comparison to the other half of the population.

Conditions such as heart diseases, osteoarthritis, cancers, strokes and autoimmune diseases present in women differently and pose considerable health risks. 

While FemTech is rapidly growing in Australia, increased health technology options are still needed to support Australian women. This has become even more apparent during the pandemic where existing inequalities in healthcare for women have been laid bare. 

Research is currently well placed in Australia with the Australian Government announcing they will be investing $354 million over the next four years to support the health and wellbeing of Australia’s women, including funding for cervical and breast cancer, endometriosis and reproductive health.

Current market snapshot

FemTech in Australia is still relatively new and unchartered territory. No official study has been conducted about Australian FemTech companies, however, the rise of new FemTech companies and products is undeniably on an upward trajectory.

The Women’s Health Summit 2021 hosted by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists highlighted issues and deficiencies in the Australian healthcare system about health equity for women; access to mental health, contraception, abortion, sexual health and reproductive services; preventative approaches to chronic diseases; and areas in the medical industry where data about women lack.

Australian companies

FemTech typically spans across medical devices, digital health applications and direct to consumer products. Even though medical related digital health applications have only entered the market within the last decade, they are fast becoming the front runner for providing women with access to crucial information about medical conditions, including their diagnosis, treatment and management. Their popularity, which has reached new heights, is primarily due to their accessibility and ease of use.

The following Australian companies have redesigned, reinvented and recycled technology to benefit the health of women:

Menstrual pain

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS) have typically been used for musculoskeletal pain, such as chronic back pain or knee joint arthritis.

Ovira, a female owned start-up had other ideas for TENS and have developed a non-invasive and instant period pain relief through their device, Noha. The Noha device sends low-level pulses of electric vibrations to the abdomen to block pain signals from being sent to the brain.

Menstruation

Since their conception, menstrual products have made their way from rags to riches. Starting off from cloth, bandages, cotton and wool in the 1800’s to disposable pads, winged pads, and tampons in the 1900’s, menstrual products have come a long way.

Modibodi, are at the forefront of menstrual technology and provide reusable and sustainable leak-proof period apparel that replaces the need for disposable products such as panty liners, tampons, pads, and incontinence products.

Juju, a socially responsible and environmentally conscious company manufactures Australia’s only made menstrual cup.

Payment solutions for the adult industry

Businesses and workers operating in the sex industry find themselves facing discrimination and often struggle to get finance or financial services.

Intimate.io, a blockchain startup, has taken this issue into their own hands. Intiamte.io is focused on solving issues inherent in the adult industry by establishing a cryptocurrency to operate as a digital payment option for adult or sexual products, services or offerings.

Fertility solutions

Despite major technological advancements in IVF, the success rates of IVF still remain very low.

Life Whisperer, an AI focused company, has been using AI to increase the chance of pregnancy through IVF by identifying morphological features that constitute a healthy embryo.

Future of FemTech Down Under

With women comprising over 50% of the population, these emerging companies have a huge opportunity to improve the health and wellbeing of millions of Australians. We expect the Australian FemTech market to continue to grow with local start-ups and from the expansion of international FemTech companies.

It is encouraging to observe the recognition by the Australian Government of the need for better understanding of pressing health challenges faced by women and the injection of money into the women’s health sector to combat some of the challenges.

Companies like Ovira, Modibodi, Juju, Intimate.io and Life Whisperer continue to break boundaries and use technology to find solutions to age old women’s health issues.

Shelston IP are proud supporters of FemTech, assisting FemTech businesses to protect their innovative new products and develop and implement intellectual property strategies to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage.

Authored by Connie Land and Allira Hudson-Gofers

4 min read

Females make up half of the population of the world, but many of the issues they have to deal with, from menstruation to menopause, have often been considered taboo subjects. In fact, until very recently, medical technology and devices for women have been considered niche.

For many years, medical technology and products have historically been developed by men, tested on men and for men, with women expected to adapt. As a result, many diagnoses in women are still undetermined, and it takes several years longer to establish comparable diagnoses in women than in men.

The rise of trailblazing innovators and entrepreneurs creating, designing and developing products and apps for women has started a women’s health revolution by lifting health taboos around the world and giving rise to a global “Femtech” industry worth many billions.

What is Femtech

Femtech, also called female technology, is a newly recognised health sector that relates to technology such as mobile apps, wearables, diagnostic tools and software that is specifically geared towards the needs of women.

Opportunities in Femtech sectors

Today, Femtech accounts for more than 200 start-ups worldwide, many of which have been founded and led by women. 

Numerous spaces and new opportunities in areas such as sex and reproduction, menstruation, fertility, and pregnancy have emerged as age-old issues are being addressed by the unification of modern technology and a focus on women’s health.

While the Femtech industry is still relatively young and underfunded, it is predicted that the industry will grow exponentially in the coming years. Revolutionary steps are continually being taken to balance out gender disparities in the healthcare industry, propelling the agenda of Femtech into the modern world.

In fact, the topic of Femtech has been searched more than ever previously recorded and is on an upwards trajectory.


(Graph obtained from Google trends. Numbers represent search interest relative to the highest point on the chart for the given region and time. A value of 100 is the peak popularity for the term. A value of 50 means that the term is half as popular.)

The shift towards women’s health has also coincided with the next wave of wearable tech products prompting an explosion of wearable technology focused on women’s health, for example, wearable smartwatches to track mensuration and pregnancy and temperatures trackers to identify fertility phases.

On the other hand, the menopause market is an area of enormous opportunity as technology is lacking and largely unexplored. While all women will experience menopause at some point, the availability of products to assist wth tracking symptons is poor, including analogue charts, and very little technology exists for treating symptoms. For that reason, we expect to see this area thrive in the future.

Ongoing challenges in Femtech

While the medical technology and device industry is shifting a considerable amount of time and effort towards women’s health, the industry still faces many challenges.

Breaking down barriers, taboos and getting health data into the hands of those who can utilise it has been a real hurdle within the industry. A particular challenge within Femtech is securing funding. In essence, this requires overcoming the hurdle of pitching female specific products to mostly male investors which solve a problem they don’t understand and can’t relate to.

Other challenges include:

  • Receiving public support about subjects people are less likely to talk about.
  • Fewer researchers in women health fields mean fewer people to apply for grants.
  • Concerns about trust, security and privacy and fear of repercussions if sensitive data was released.

Future of Femtech

The future of Femtech is bright as the awareness of female-oriented health and technology continues to gain momentum, while the taboo around women’s health dissipates.

So far we have only seen the tip of the iceberg in female-focused technology. Notably, the developments in AI and the Internet of Things have largely contributed to the rise of Femtech and will continue to do so. Only recently have tech juggernauts, Fitbit and Apple, developed technology aimed at women’s health. In April 2018, Fitbit unveiled a woman focused smartwatch which allows women to track their menstrual cycle, followed by Apple in June 2019, who added a reproductive health tracking feature to their operating platform.

According to a report by research consultancy Frost & Sullivan, the value of the industry is increasing rapidly. It was estimated that the Femtech industry was worth US$200 million in 2018 and will skyrocket to a potential worth of US$50 billion by 2025.

Conclusion

As Femtech continues to pave the future, we will continue to explore other aspects of Femtech in Australia and Femtech in relation to Intellectual property through a series of focused articles.

Authored by Connie Land and Allira Hudson-Gofers

3 min read

Following a cacophony of dire warnings and lobbying over the past decade from the Australian biotechnology and medical sectors, and the sudden sharp focus of middle Australia on the critical importance of onshore manufacturing facilities such as those capable of mRNA vaccine production, the Federal Government has announced the introduction of a $206.4m patent box for Australian medical and biotechnology industries as part of the 2021-2022 Federal Budget handed down on 11 May 2021.

Named quite literally after a tick box historically present on income tax forms, a patent box provides tax incentives designed to encourage companies to commercialise and manufacture patented technology locally. From 1 July 2022, Australia’s proposed patent box is slated to tax income derived from eligible patents at a concessional corporate tax rate of 17%, rather than the standard corporate tax rate of 30%, or 25% for small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

While the specifics are yet to be established, the patent box is proposed to apply to income derived from granted Australian patents in the medical and biotechnology sectors filed after the budget announcement (ie, after 11 May 2021), providing that at least a portion of the research and development (R&D) of the technology occurred in Australia. The following example was provided with the Federal budget papers: A company selling a patented product makes $175 million in net income directly attributable to the patent. If 80% of the R&D associated with the patented product occurred in Australia, then 80% of the income (ie, $140 million) would enjoy the concessional 17% tax rate. 

The measure is intended to incentivise Australian companies to invest in and perform their R&D, commercialisation and manufacturing of patented technologies onshore. It has been warmly received by the Australian biotechnology sector with Lorraine Chiroiu, CEO of AusBiotech, stating that the organization whole-heartedly commends the initiative: “This tax incentive will address the gap that leaves our IP vulnerable, retain home-grown IP, and support Australian innovators and manufacturers. It will make the commercialisation of IP and manufacturing in Australia more genuinely viable for businesses.”

Cochlear’s CEO, Dig Howitt, has similarly commented: “Incentivising companies of all sizes to keep their intellectual property and manufacturing in Australia will generate substantial economic benefits through royalties, licence fees, tax revenues, supply chains, jobs, and capital investment.”

CSL CEO Dr Andrew Nash concurs, stating, “CSL welcomes the introduction of a patent box which will help decrease the flow of intellectual property from local medical research going overseas. It will drive the growth of advanced manufacturing jobs, capital intensive investment and sovereign capacity in medical technology and biotechnology manufacturing.”

A number of countries already have patent box regimes, including the UK, Belgium, Spain, France, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Switzerland, and China. Australia’s patent box is set to follow the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s guidance on patent boxes to meet internationally accepted standards.

The Government has indicated that it will consult with industry on the design of the patent box and explore whether the regime should be extended to include clean energy patents. Lobbying from that sector is already well underway.

On a technical note, several years typically elapse between patent filing and patent grant. Accordingly, it could be some three or four years before the patent box regime begins to provide significant benefit. Patent grant can, however, be brought forward by various means including requesting early national phase entry in Australia followed by expedited examination. If you require advice on this issue, Shelston IP would be happy to help.     

Authored by Karen Heilbronn Lee, PhD and Allira Hudson-Gofers

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Authored by Greg Whitehead and Allira Hudson-Gofers

2 min read

Following on from our article of 14 May 2020, Australian Designs – Changes on the Way, we advise that the Australian Designs Exposure Draft BillRegulations, accompanying draft Explanatory Memorandum and Explanatory Statement have now been released.  IP Australia have invited interested parties to provide comment and Shelston IP has made a submission.

If passed in its proposed form, the Draft Bill will codify many of the recommendations accepted by the Government from the former Advisory Council on Intellectual Property’s (ACIP) review of the Designs System.  Amongst others, these changes include: the introduction of a twelve-month grace period, expanding the existing prior use defence, removal of the formal request for requesting registration, providing exclusive licensees to sue for infringement, and clarifying the meaning of the standard of the informed user.

Notable points

Of note, the Draft Bill provides exclusions to the proposed grace period for two types of publications – publications by the Registrar of Designs, and publications by foreign persons/agencies entrusted with the registration of designs. In both cases, the Explanatory Memorandum advises that publications of these types are not the inadvertent publications that the grace period is intended to protect.

Further, with regard to prior use, it is noted that the Draft Bill omits reference to the prior user activity having occurred in Australia like it does with the equivalent provisions of the Patents Act 1990.

As mentioned in our previous article, there are several proposals that will not be progressing at this time. These include: the protection of partial designs, the protection of virtual, non-physical and active state designs, and the clarification of registered’ and ‘certified’ designs. These proposals remain on IP Australia’s Policy Register and if you wish to provide a submission, IP Australia invite you to do so via the Policy Register.

IP Australia is also working on a new online filing system to make the application process smoother, improving access to information on their website, and exploring further reform measures resulting from our research into the design economy and the role of the design rights system. This includes a series of research reports that are now available online.

Authored by Rodney Dabboussy and Allira Hudson-Gofers

For a number of years, Shelston IP has partnered with Girls Invent an organisation dedicated to inspiring and motivating girls to become successful innovators. At Shelston IP, innovation is our passion, and we are excited to support Girls Invent through our pro bono advice program in its mission to encourage innovation.

Girls Invent invited Allira Hudson-Gofers and Tam Huynh to take part in a podcast to discuss their successful careers and the influences that have shaped them to become the women they are today.

Tune in here to listen to what they had say.

Authored by Allira Hudson-Gofers and Tam Huynh

2 min read

To celebrate International Women in Engineering day (23 June 2020), Shelston IP would like to highlight our outstanding female patent attorneys and patent engineers qualified in this field.

With 30 years of experience in the patent profession, Caroline Bommer is the female engineer that we aspire to be. She provides a wonderful example of the possibilities for our young female attorneys and is appreciated by all of her clients, particularly in her effective communication and her ability to understand their business strategies. Caroline’s mechanical engineering expertise is also extensive, including practical knowledge acquired prior to joining the patent profession in the industries of building, transport, aerospace, and defence. She has a keen interest in green technologies, with many years of personal involvement in solar car racing. Ask her to take you for a spin!

Tam Huynh works in the fields of electrical engineering and information technology patents. Growing up, Tam would find any excuse to integrate electronics into her arts and crafts projects. This included raiding her Dad’s electronics kit to make LED greeting cards for her family. She went on to study Computer Engineering at University and undertook a project exploring the use of solar power technologies and their application with mobile devices. Tam now assists with the ongoing management of patent portfolios in a range of fields, including electrical power systems, information and software systems, mining and automation, and medical devices. Tam also holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree and her accounting background adds additional depth to her handling of financial-system related inventions.

With childhood memories of jumping off a red billy cart and yelling “Newton’s third law”, Allira Hudson-Gofers brings her enjoyment of physics and engineering into her role as the head of Shelston IP’s Engineering and ICT Patents Group. Allira studied both mechatronics and biomedical engineering at University, going on to develop particular expertise in research, product development, regulatory affairs, and intellectual property in the medical technology space. She now applies this expertise, together with her recent MBA studies, to help her clients protect and commercialise their innovations.  

Connie Land had her interest in the human body and medical devices sparked in high school, which lead her to pursue a degree in Biomedical Engineering. Connie started her career with hands-on experience maintaining, repairing, and programming medical devices.  Last year, after discovering that the role of a patent attorney was a career option for engineering graduates, she hung up her tools and joined Shelston IP as a Patent Engineer. Connie now works with medical devices in a different capacity and uses her passion and knowledge of medical devices and technology to help her clients navigate the path to obtaining patent and design protection. She is currently studying a Masters in Intellectual Property and is looking forward to becoming a registered patent attorney in Australia and New Zealand. 

Authored by Allira Hudson-Gofers, Caroline Bommer, Tam Huynh and Connie Land

1 min read

IP Australia has now released its proposals for implementing the recommendations of the Advisory Council on Intellectual Property’s (ACIP) to improve the Australian designs system.

For background, in 2012 ACIP was asked to investigate and improve the effectiveness of the designs system in stimulating innovation by Australian users and the impact the designs system has on economic growth. This review led to the release by ACIP of an Options Paper for public consultation on 3rd December 2014 and a Final Report in 2015.

After considering stakeholder submissions on the recommendations laid out in the Final Report, IP Australia is now proceeding with a number of proposals, the most notable being:

  1.   An automatic grace period of 12 months from the priority date with a prior use defence based on Section 119 of the Patents Act 1990.
  2.   Removal of the requirement to request registration of the design. Registration would now occur six months after the filing the application.
  3.   Removal of the rarely used option of only publishing a design and not registering it.
  4.   Revision of Section 19(4) of the Act to clarify the standard of the informed user consistent with the Multisteps approach.
  5.   Liability for infringement to be removed before Registration (consistent with other IP rights).

Left on the table at this present time are any changes to the protection of partial and virtual designs (e.g. GUI’s), and a formal publication/registration delay process.

IP Australia says that it will release an exposure draft of the proposed Bill and supporting regulations in the second half of 2020. After participating in the stakeholder submissions, Shelston IP welcome these improvements and look forward to them being passed into law.

A full copy of IP Australia’s response can be found here.

Authored by Rodney Dabboussy and Allira Hudson-Gofers