10 min read

Office of the Retirement Commissioner v Cash Converters Pty Ltd [2020] NZIPOTM 27 (23 December 2020)

This recent decision provides helpful guidance on the principles for partial revocation of trade mark registrations in New Zealand and the determination of a “fair description” for goods and services.

The decision also highlights important differences between the law and practice on non-use removal proceedings in Australia and New Zealand.

Background

Cash Converters Pty Ltd (“Cash Converters”) sought partial revocation of the Office of the Retirement Commissioner’s (ORC) Registration No. 637400 SORTED. It covered Class 36 services in providing advisory, consultancy and information services relating to finance, investment and financial planning for and during retirement, and providing financial information relating to retirement.

They also sought partial revocation of Registration No. 976028 SORTED, which covered broadly worded Class 36 services “financial affairs; monetary affairs; real estate affairs” and various services in providing advice, consultancy and information the areas of finance, monetary affairs, retirement, real estate, property and insurance and Class 41 educational services and services in providing educational material and information relating to insurance, financial affairs, monetary affairs, real estate affairs.  The full specifications for the registrations are at [1].  

Revocation was sought on the basis of non-use of the SORTED mark for a continuous period of three years.

Facts/evidence

ORC started using its SORTED mark in 2001, when it established its website www.sorted.com for providing information and tools, such as online calculators, to help New Zealanders prepare for, and manage, their finances during retirement. 

From at least 2013 ORC’s use of SORTED expanded to a broader range of services in providing information, advice and resources to promote “the life-long financial literacy of New Zealanders”.  With this expansion in 2013, ORC obtained the later Registration No. 976028 SORTED for the broader range of services. 

ORC’s evidence of use included use of the SORTED mark on guides, booklets, seminar and course details, on online tools and calculators and on an online forum.  [2]

Discussion

As the SORTED mark had not been used on all of the services covered by the registrations, partial revocation was in order.   

The Assistant Commissioner noted the High Court decision in Sky Network Television Ltd v Sky Fiber Inc (Sky Network) confirming how partial revocation applications should be considered:

The case law establishes that the first task is to find as a fact what goods or services there has been genuine use of the trade mark in relation to; and then to ‘arrive at a fair specification of goods having regard to the use made’.”  [3]

ORC was found to have used the SORTED mark to provide generalised information, advice and education on retirement planning and financial literacy generally.  ORC was also found to have used the mark to provide online calculator tools and an online community forum which provided users with more specific information and recommendations. 

In considering what was a “fair description” of those services provided under the mark, the Assistant Commissioner identified the principles set out by Mallon J in Sky Network:

“(a) The assessment has “nothing to do with the defendant.” Defining the goods negatively by reference to the defendants’ activities is therefore not the approach. 

(b) The proprietor has protection outside his or her specification of goods in areas where he or she can demonstrate a likelihood of deception under other provisions. “There is no pressing need, therefore, to confer on the proprietor a wider protection than his [or her] use warrants by unduly broadening the specification of goods.

(c) The width of the surviving specification “must depend largely upon questions of fact and degree.”  “Wide words can cover what are commercially quite different sorts of articles”.  If there is shown to be use of just one of those things “it would be commercially nonsense to maintain the registration for all goods caused by the wide words”. [4]

In summary, and further quoting Mallon J in Sky Network, the Assistant Commissioner noted that:

The “fair description” is one “which would be given in the context of trade mark protection” and depends on the nature of the goods, the circumstances of the trade and the breadth of use proved” and should be approached as ““objective and impartial, balancing the competing interests” and “a view from the trade”.[5]

The Assistant Commissioner recognised the important “balancing exercise” of competing interests of the owner, competitors and the public:

  1. to have the Register uncluttered with unused marks or with registrations with overly broad specifications;
  2. to prevent parties being unjustifiably exposed to infringement of registrations with overly broad specifications; and
  3. “the owner’s interest in protecting its brand” which “aligns with the public interest in consumers not being deceived or confused by use of another trade mark” and the owner’s entitlement “to commercially realistic protection, remembering the test for infringement, extends to similar goods and services”.  [6]

Findings 

The scope of the original specifications was considered to “extend well beyond the actual use that had been made of the SORTED mark”.  [7]

The Assistant Commissioner considered that a “fair description” of the services offered under the SORTED mark could be reached by considering the “functions (the way the mark has been used) and the generalised, rather than personalised, nature of the education, information and advice ORC provides”.  [8] 

ORC was not using the SORTED mark in relation to all types of information, education and advisory services in the areas of insurance, finance, money, real estate and investment.  Those services were all provided in giving advice and information focusing on retirement and personal financial literacy, and not on all aspects of insurance, finance, money and other matters.

The Assistant Commissioner found that it was appropriate to limit the specifications to reflect the focus of the use and reworded the services more narrowly and as all “relating [or related] to retirement and personal finance”.

Further, ORC’s advice was not personalised advice given to individuals.  Rather, it was generalised advice and information.  The general description “advisory services relating to…” in the original Class 36 specifications for both registrations was considered too broad.  The Assistant Commissioner considered that it would be fair to describe those services as “general advice relating to…”.

The original term “consultancy services relating to…” used in the Class 36 specifications for both registrations was removed because ORC would not be reasonably understood to be a consultancy business.  The Assistant Commissioner noted that “there is no aspect of the ORC business that technically requires the description to be used. ORC is able to have commercially realistic protection without the reference to consultancy”.  [9]

The full specifications as amended are at footnote  [10].

Earlier cases considering partial revocation

The Assistant Commissioner provided a helpful summary of earlier partial revocation cases and what was found to be a “fair description” for the goods and services.  This can be found at paragraph 71. 

These decisions show that precise descriptions are applied in partial revocation actions and that broad and unqualified descriptions are unlikely to be allowed under New Zealand practice. 

Comparison with Australian law

The decision highlights some important differences between the law on revocation/non-use removal actions in Australia and New Zealand. 

1. Discretion to remove or restrict a registration

The Assistant Commissioner noted in the decision that there is no “overriding discretion to refuse to revoke or partially revoke a registration”, which follows from the decision Crocodile International Pte Ltd v Lacoste [2017] NZSC 14 at [97].  [11]  Under New Zealand law, a trade mark owner must show use during the three year non-use period, or special circumstances that justify non-use of their mark, to successfully oppose a revocation application.

Unlike New Zealand, under Australian law the Registrar has the discretion under s 101(3) of the Trade Marks Act 1995 not to remove a registration even where there has not been use of the mark if “satisfied that it is reasonable” not to remove the registration.  Further, s 101(4) provides that in deciding under subsection (3) not to remove a registration the Registrar may take into account use of the mark on similar goods or closely related services or similar services or closely related goods. 

2. Standing to apply for removal for non use

New Zealand law requires that only an “aggrieved person” can apply for revocation of a registration.   As noted in the decision “the term “aggrieved person” is given a wide and liberal interpretation.  This will generally include trade rivals.  As well as someone who is disadvantaged in a legal or practical way.”  [12]

However, under Australian law any person can apply for removal of a registration for non-use and there is no requirement for the removal applicant to show aggrievement to have standing to apply for removal. 

3. Date of revocation

In the New Zealand decision, the Assistant Commissioner noted that “the result of revocation is that the owner’s rights cease to exist on the date the application revocation was filed, or at an earlier date if the Commissioner is satisfied the non-use ground has been made out at an earlier date.”  [13]

Under Australian law, the date of removal of a registration for non-use is the date of the Registrar’s decision and the Registrar does not have the discretion to determine an earlier date for removal.

Takeaway

There are important differences in relation to standing and discretion in revocation/non-use removal proceedings in New Zealand and Australia which trade mark owners should note.

When defending a non-use removal action in Australia, and there has been no use of the mark during the 3 year non-use period, trade mark owners should still consider whether there are grounds for convincing the Registrar to refuse removal of the registration, such as some residual reputation in the mark from earlier use or possibly overseas reputation.

In New Zealand, it is much more likely than it is in Australia that broad descriptions will be restricted to more specific and limited descriptions.


[1] Services covered by Registration No. 637400 SORTED:

Class 36:Providing advisory, consultancy and information services relating to finance, investment and financial planning for and during retirement; providing financial information relating to retirement by means of telecommunication and electronic networks including online, via a global or other communications network, the world-wide web, an intranet or the Internet

Services covered by Registration No. 976028 SORTED:

Class 36: Financial affairs; monetary affairs; real estate affairs; providing advisory, consultancy and information services relating to finance, investment and financial planning for and during retirement; advisory services relating to real estate ownership; providing financial information relating to retirement by means of telecommunication and electronic networks including online, via a global or other communications network, the world-wide web, an intranet or the Internet; consultancy services relating to insurance; information services relating to insurance; insurance advisory services; insurance information; provision of insurance information; consultation services relating to real estate; providing information, including online, about insurance, financial and monetary affairs and real estate affairs; provision of information in relation to real estate; provision of information relating to property (real estate); provision of information relating to real estate; real estate advisory; services; real estate investment advice

Class 41: Dissemination of educational material; education services; educational services; life coaching (training or education services); provision of educational information; provision of education services via an online forum; publication of educational materials; publication of educational texts; the aforementioned relating to insurance, financial affairs, monetary affairs, real estate affairs

[2] Arguing that ORC did not provide financial advisory services, Cash Converters’ evidence in support of the revocation application referred to ORC’s disclaimers on its website that its information and tools “should be treated as a guide only” and should be used before seeking professional advice.  It was also noted that ORC’s “Investor Kickstarter” guide is referred to on the website as a guide only which  “does not constitute investment advice to any person”.  The evidence also noted that ORC is not a registered financial services provider under the Financial Services Provider (Regulation and Dispute Resolution) Act 2008 (RDR Act). 

In reply, ORC filed evidence that it is not required to be registered under the RDR Act as it is not a business which provides financial services as defined under the Act.  ORC also noted that their “Investor Kickstarter” tool asks high level questions to categorise participants into one of five types of investors and that their disclaimer clarifies that the advice given through this tool is not the type of financial advice to which the Financial Advisors Act 2008 would apply. 

[3] Office of the Retirement Commissioner v Cash Converters Pty Ltd [2020] NZIPOTM 27 (23 December 2020), paragraph 39.

[4] ibid, paragraph 44.

[5] ibid, paragraph 45.

[6] ibid, paragraph 52.

[7] ibid, paragraph 110.

[8] ibid, paragraph 113.

[9] ibid, paragraph 96.

[10] Registration No. 637400

Class 36: Providing information services and general advice relating to finance, investment and financial planning for and during retirement; providing financial information and general advice relating to retirement by means of telecommunication and electronic networks including online, via a global or other communications network, the worldwide web, an intranet or the Internet

Registration 976028

Class 36: Providing information and general advice, including online, about insurance, financial and monetary affairs and real estate affairs related to retirement and personal finance; provision of financial calculation services relating to retirement and personal financial planning including budgeting, personal debt, home buying, mortgages, superannuation, investment and savings, including by way of online; calculators; providing information services and general advice relating to finance, investment and financial planning for and during retirement; providing financial information and general advice relating to retirement by means of telecommunication and electronic networks including online, via a global or other communications network, the world-wide web, an intranet or the Internet.

Class 41: Education services related to retirement and personal financial matters including financial planning and budgeting, debt, home buying, mortgages, superannuation, investment and savings; provision and dissemination of educational material and information related to retirement and personal financial matters, including by way online communication, websites, web blogs, social media, forums, publications (including texts, guides and brochures), news articles, training, courses, seminars and meetings.

[11] ibid, paragraph 12 quoting  Crocodile International Pte Ltd v Lacoste [2017] NZSC 14 at [97]

[12] ibid, paragraph 28.

[13] ibid, paragraph 11.

Authored by Michelle Howe and Sean McManis

7 min read

Urban Alley Brewery Pty Ltd v La Sirène Pty Ltd [2020] FCAFC 186 (4 November 2020)

The Full Federal Court has upheld the primary judge’s decision to cancel Urban Alley Brewery Pty Ltd’s (Urban Alley) registration for “Urban Ale”.   The decision considers the issue of distinctiveness and highlights important lessons regarding the enforcement of trade marks which have descriptive significance, within the trade and relevant market.

Primary Decision

Urban Alley owned Registration No. 1775261 for the trade mark Urban Ale covering “beer” in Class 32 and dated 14 June 2016. Urban Alley sued La Sirène Pty Ltd (La Sirène) for use of the trade mark:

(URBAN PALE label) on its beer product, launched in October 2016.  Urban Alley also sought cancellation of La Sirène’s registration for the URBAN PALE label.

La Sirène filed  a cross claim for cancellation of Urban Alley’s Urban Ale registration under s88(1)(a) of the Trade Marks Act 1995 on the basis that:

  • Urban Ale is not capable of distinguishing beer products (s 41(1)); and
  • Urban Ale was deceptively similar to an earlier third party mark Urban Brewing Company, registered under Registration No. 1760362 and covering beer (s 44(1)).  [1]

In the primary decision Justice O’Bryan cancelled the Urban Ale mark on both grounds, finding that:

  • Urban Ale was not capable of distinguishing beers because the ordinary signification of the combination “urban” and “ale” was of a craft beer brewed in an inner-city location; and
  • Urban Ale was deceptively similar to the earlier Urban Brewing Company mark. 

While there was no infringement because the Urban Ale registration was cancelled, the primary judge went on to consider whether La Sirène’s use of its URBAN PALE logo would have infringed the Urban Ale registration, and if so, whether it had defences to infringement that:

  • La Sirène used URBAN PALE in good faith to indicate the kind, quality or other characteristics of the products (s 122(1)(b)(i); and
  • La Sirène was exercising its rights to use the mark as registered  (s 122(1)(e)) as it had obtained a registration for the URBAN PALE label in use during the litigation.

The primary judge found that URBAN PALE was used as a product name and not as a trade mark, and therefore did not infringe the Urban Ale registration. 

On upholding the first defence, La Sirène was found to have used URBAN PALE as a description to  indicate the nature and style of the product as a craft beer brewed in an urban location. 

In relation to the second defence, La Sirène had used its URBAN PALE label as registered under its Registration No. 1961656 and so had a defence under s 122(1)(e).  [2]

The primary judge also found that Urban Alley had not made out grounds for cancellation of La Sirène’s registration for the URBAN PALE label. 

Appeal Decision

Urban Alley appealed, challenging the primary judge’s findings.

  1. Capable of distinguishing

On the first ground of appeal, that the primary judge erred in finding Urban Ale not capable of distinguishing, the judges noted that the primary judge’s finding might ordinarily seem surprising.  However, their honours noted that the decision was based on contextual facts and usage of the word “urban” in the brewery trade.  They referred to the primary judge’s findings that:

  •  it was well understood that many brewers are located in urban areas and, when used in relation to beer, “urban” “conveyed the meaning that the beer was brewed in a city location as opposed to a country location”[3];
  • “‘urban’ had come to signify craft beer made in an inner city location” and could also be laudatory indicating that the beer is “fashinonable”, “trendy” or “cool” [4] ;
  • there was evidence that journalists had used “urban” to refer to beer producers and breweries had used “urban” as part of their product names;
  • ordinary consumers would understand “urban” as referring to a craft beer produced in an innner city location; and
  • “urban ale”, in its ordinary signification, would therefore indicate craft beer produced in an urban location.

The judges found no appealable error in the primary judge’s finding and agreed that Urban Ale was not capable of distinguishing. [5]

  1. Deceptive similarity

The appeal judges found no error in the primary judge’s finding that “Urban Ale” was deceptively similar to the “Urban Brewing Company” mark. 

On appeal, Urban Alley argued that the primary judge’s comments that the marks meant different things – with Urban Ale referring to beer and Urban Brewing Company referring to a maker of beer – meant that the judge ought to have found the marks not deceptively similar.  However, the appeal judges noted that these comments were made in the side by side comparison of marks for assessing whether the marks were substantially identical.  The judges noted that “ the test of deceptive similarity is fundamentally different. It is not a studied comparison. Rather, it is a comparison between one mark and the impression of another mark carried away and hypothetically recalled, paying due regard to the fact that recollection is not always perfect”.  [6]  The appeal judges agreed with the primary judge’s finding that, while Urban Ale and Urban Brewing Company had different meanings in a side by side comparison, there is a close association between the two marks making them deceptively similar.

Urban Alley also argued that substantial weight should be given to the other elements “ale” and “brewing company” in the marks and that those elements had “no relevant trade mark resemblance”.  [7]  However, their honours noted that the marks must be considered as a whole:

It is impermissible to dissect each mark to emphasise its disparate elements and then compare the disparate elements of each in order to reach a conclusion on deceptive resemblance. To start with, this would leave out entirely the impact of the common element “urban”. It would also ignore the synergy between the word “urban” and the other word(s) in each mark. This synergy contributes to the impression gained of each mark, which is carried forward into the relevant comparison between the two.”.  [8]

Given that “ale” and “brewing company” would be clearly associated in meaning, and were both combined with the element “urban”, the appeal judges agreed that the marks were deceptively similar. 

While the appeal judges upheld the primary judge’s decision to cancel the Urban Ale mark, and the case on infringement could not therefore succeed, the judges went on to consider the other grounds of appeal.    

  1. Use of URBAN PALE as a trade mark

On the question of whether La Sirène used URBAN PALE as a trade mark, the appeal judges agreed with the primary judge’s finding that URBAN PALE was used as “a product name that is descriptive of the nature and style of the beer product”.   [9]  They agreed that consumers would understand URBAN PALE as referring to a craft beer brewed in an inner city location (“urban”) in a pale ale style (“pale”) and would not see URBAN PALE as a trade mark for distinguishing the beer products from those of other traders.  

They noted that URBAN PALE was the most prominent element on La Sirene’s label and that  ordinarily this would be persuasive in finding trade mark use.  However, because URBAN PALE would be seen as a product description, trade mark use could not be found.  The judges referred to the primary judge’s words “I do not consider that prominence converts the essentially descriptive name into a mark indicating the source of origin”.  [10]

Urban Alley’s appeal was dismissed on all grounds.  [11]

Takeaways

This decision is a reminder of the limitations of adopting and registering marks with descriptive significance.  Competitors may easily avoid infringement where they can argue that they are using their trade mark descriptively.  Further, a registration for a descriptive mark will be vulnerable to cancellation on the basis that it lacks distinctiveness.  Trade mark owners are advised that the strongest rights to be obtained are in registrations for marks which have no descriptive significance in relation to the goods or services.

The case also indicates that giving prominence to a mark in labelling will not convert descriptive words into trade marks.  Further, registering a label with prominent, but descriptive, elements will not give exclusive rights to the descriptive elements.


[1] In the primary decision La Sirène had also sought cancellation of the Urban Ale registration on the basis that Urban Alley was not the owner of the Urban Ale mark due to the earlier registration for Urban Brewing Company (s 58).  This was dismissed on the basis that the marks were not substantially identical and the primary judge’s decision on this point was not appealed.

[2] La Sirène had also raised a defence under s 222(1)(e) on the basis of its registration for “Farmhouse Style Urban Pale by La Serene” covering beers. However, the primary judge did not consider it necessary to consider that defence, given that La Sirène could already rely on its registration for the URBAN PALE logo for the defence under s 222(1)(e).

[3] Urban Alley Brewery Pty Ltd v La Sirène Pty Ltd [2020] FCAFC 186 (4 November 2020), paragraph 59.

[4] Ibid, paragraph 60.

[5] Urban Alley had argued that the primary judge had suggested that “Urban Ale” was allusive and metaphorical when finding that it indicates beer made in an urban location which is “cool” or “trendy” and therefore could not be directly descriptive.  This was dismissed, with the judges saying “urban” has a clear and direct meaning.  They also tried to argue that the mark did not indicate a characteristic of the beers and therefore did not fall within the Note after s 41 [5]because it did not indicate a “characteristic” of the beers in terms of flavour or style.  This argument was unsuccessful, with the judges finding that Urban Ale could indicate  other “characteristics” such as beers produced in an inner city location.

[6] Ibid, paragraph 99.

[7] Ibid, paragraphs 105 and 106.

[8] Ibid, paragraph 106.

[9] Ibid, paragraph 119.

[10] Ibid, paragraph 119.

[11] The judges did not need to consider Urban Alley’s challenge of the primary judge’s decision that La Sirène could rely on the defence that it used URBAN PALE to indicate the kind, quality or other characteristics of the beer products (s 122(1)(b)(i).  This was because they had already upheld the primary judge’s decision that Urban Ale functions descriptively and is not inherently adapted to distinguish and the issues were essentially the same in relation to URBAN PALE.

Urban Alley had also challenged the primary judge’s finding that La Sirène would have a defence under s 122(1)(e), as it used the URBAN PALE label as registered, and the primary judge’s refusal to cancel La Sirène’s registration for the URBAN PALE label.  These grounds of appeal were dismissed.  Firstly, it was unnecessary and too remote to consider any defence under s 122(1)(e), given there was no infringement.  Secondly, Urban Alley’s registration for Urban Ale, which would have blocked the application for the URBAN PALE logo, had been removed from the Register.

Authored by Michelle Howe and Sean McManis

8 min read

In the recent decision of Ceramiche Caesar S.p.A. V Caesarstone Ltd [2020] FCAFC 124 (28 July 2020) the Full Federal Court decided that the primary judge had erred in finding “honest concurrent” use of the CAESARSTONE mark.  The decision also considers the requirements for “quality control” and a finding of “authorised use”.

Proceedings

The decision involved Ceramiche Caesar S.p.A’s (Ceramiche Caesar) appeal of the primary judge’s decision to allow Caesarstone Ltd’s (Caesarstone) Australian Trade Mark Application No 1058321 for the word mark CAESARSTONE (CAESARSTONE Mark) to proceed to registration for certain class 19 floor and wall goods on the basis of honest concurrent use.

The decision also involved proceedings in Ceramiche Caesar’s appeal of the primary judge’s decision to allow Caesarstone’s Australian Trade Mark Application No 1211153 for

to proceed to registration for certain goods and services in classes 19, 35 and 37 (Caesarstone Device Mark) and to allow Caesarstone’s Australian Trade Mark Registration No 1211152 for the word mark CAESARSTONE to remain registered for services in classes 35 and 37 (Caesarstone Services Word Mark).

The parties agreed that the result in the first proceeding would determine the results in the second proceedings and almost entirely determine the result in the third proceeding.  The discussion below therefore relates only to the first proceeding.

Facts

The appellant, Ceramiche Caesar, has manufactured ceramic tiles for indoor and outdoor flooring and wall cladding in Australia since 1988. Effective from 23 November 2004, Ceramiche Caesar has had a registration in class 19 covering  “ceramic tiles for indoor and outdoor use” for a CAESAR device mark:

The respondentCaesarstone, is an Israeli company that manufactures and sells large quartz slabs which have been labelled on the underside of the slab with the mark “CAESARSTONE” since 1987.

Caesarstone’s slabs were distributed in Australia from 2003 by two distributors: Caesarstone’s licensee, Tessera Stones and Tiles Pty Ltd (Tessera) and Tessera’s sub-licensee, Carsilstone Pty Ltd (Carsilstone). In 2006, Caesarstone incorporated an Australian subsidiary, Caesarstone Australia Pty Ltd (Caesarstone Australia).

From 2003 the distributors, Tessera and Carsilstone, sold the slabs to stonemasons in Australia who would then convert them into finished products, including benchtops and countertops, vanities and surrounds and splashbacks, which would then be sold on to customers.

Ceramiche Caesar’s CAESAR device mark registration was cited against the  application to register the CAESARSTONE mark on 2 June 2005.  To overcome this citation, Caesarstone amended its goods specification to disclaim “tiles” as follows:

Panels for floors, floor coverings, wall cladding, ceilings; non-metallic covers for use with floors and parts thereof; profiles and floor skirting boards; none of the foregoing being in the nature of tiles.”

The CAESARSTONE application was subsequently successfully opposed by Ceramiche Caesar, with the Registrar’s delegate deciding that the CAESARSTONE mark was deceptively similar to the CAESAR device mark and that, based on the facts, the exception for “honest concurrent use” under s 44(3)(a) and/or “prior continuous use” under s 44(3)(4) of the Trade Marks Act 1995 should not apply.

Caesarstone appealed the decision and the primary judge in Caesarstone Ltd v Ceramiche Caesar S.p.A. (No 2) [2018] FCA 1096 (Caesarstone (No 2)). found that there had been “honest concurrent use” of the CAESARSTONE mark on floor panels and wall cladding and that the use of the CAESARSTONE mark by Caesarstone’s distributors was “authorised use”.

On the appeal the two main issues in dispute in the first proceedings were whether the primary judge erred in concluding that:

(1) there was honest concurrent use of the CAESARSTONE mark on the designated Class 19 goods;

(2) the prior use of the trade mark was authorised use under Caesarstone’s control”.  [1]

Honest concurrent use

The interpretation of the disclaimer of “tiles” in the goods description was crucial to the question of whether there was honest concurrent use.

Caesarstone argued that the exclusion of “tiles” from its specification was of no significance because it did not limit the goods specifically listed in the specification.  They relied on the primary judge’s finding that the disclaimer did not “subtract all content from” the words “panels for floors” and “wall cladding”.  [2]

Ceramiche Caesar argued that the disclaimer effectively excluded tiles.  As the primary judge found that the goods in honest concurrent use were floor panels and wall cladding in the nature of tiles, there was therefore no honest concurrent use of the mark in respect of the goods covered by the application.

Their Honours considered that “as a matter of plain English, the words “none of the foregoing being in the nature of tiles” operate to limit the class 19 goods to include only panels for floors, floor coverings and wall claddings which are not in the nature of tiles”.  They said that “the primary judge’s conclusion that the tile disclaimer did not “subtract all content” from the words “[p]anels for floors, floor coverings, and wall cladding” which are not “in the nature of tiles” was a statement of the obvious” and “not a statement which supports the conclusion that the tile disclaimer was “ineffectual” in the sense contended for by the respondent”.  [3]

The Full Court held that the primary judge erred in finding honest concurrent use because honest concurrent use must be in respect of the goods covered by the application. In this case, the finding of honest concurrent use was for goods which were all “in the nature of tiles”.  As tiles had been expressly excluded from the specification they were not covered.

The Full Court also refused Caesarstone’s request to remove the disclaimer, because this would effectively widen the scope of the registration to include tiles.

Authorised use

While the Full Court found that there had not been honest concurrent use, and the second question of whether Caesarstone’s use would have been “authorised use” did not therefore strictly arise, the judges considered the question briefly.

Section 8(1) of the Trade Marks Act 1995 states that a person is an authorised user “if the person uses the trade mark under the control of the owner of the trade mark” and section 8(3) provides that:

(3) If the owner of a trade mark exercises quality control over goods or services:

(a) dealt with or provided in the course of trade by another person; and

(b) in relation to which the trade mark is used;

the other person is taken, for the purposes of subsection (1), to use the trade mark in relation to the goods or services under the control of the owner.

The primary judge’s finding that Caesarstone’s prior concurrent use was authorised use under Caesarstone’s control and therefore use in accordance with section 8(3) of the Trade Marks Act was on the basis that Caesarstone:

“(1) gave instructions regarding slab transport and storage to the Australian distributors;

(2) provided technical and marketing support services to the Australian distributors;

(3) sought to exercise quality control by ensuring that the Australian distributors provided fabrication and installation manuals to the stonemasons, and contributing to the content of these manuals.”  [4]

However, on appeal their Honours decided that the evidence did not support this and that the primary had judged erred in finding authorised use.

The Full Court stated that “Authorised use requires the trade mark applicant to establish “control as a matter of substance”: Lodestar Anstalt v Campari America LLC [2016] FCAFC 92(2016) 244 FCR 557 (Lodestar) at [97]. What constitutes control as a matter of substance is informed by the function of the trade mark, which is to indicate a connection in the course of trade with the registered owner – see PioneerKabushiki Kaisha v Registrar of Trade Marks [1977] HCA 56(1977) 137 CLR 670 (Pioneer) at 683 per Aickin J”. (pgh 39).  [5]  The court also noted “the critical enquiry is whether there was quality control with respect to the designated goods”.

The court held that Caesarstone did not exercise quality control because the control was not in relation to the designated goods, being panels for floor covering and wall covering.  Further the quality control was not in relation to the work of the stonemasons who fabricated the slabs into the finished products and were therefore responsible for the ultimate quality of the designated goods.  Their honours found that “not only did Caesarstone not have any contractual relationship with the stonemasons, but there was no evidence that Caesarstone ever inspected the stonemasons’ work or conducted any quality control regarding the final product.” [6]

In relation to the evidence on which the primary judge based his finding of quality control, the court noted that:

  1. Caesarstone’s storage and transport instructions only ensured that the slabs were not damaged, they did not enforce quality control over the finished products covered by the application being the panels for floor covering and wall cladding;
  2. The installation and fabrication manuals provided by the distributors to stonemasons were for guidance only and the “provision of technical information is not, at least of itself, the exercise of quality control”. [7]
  3. There were no terms relating to “quality control standards, brand guidelines, marketing approval mechanisms or rights of inspection of fabricated product” in Caesarstone’s distribution agreement with Tessera. [8]

Authorised use on a wider basis

The primary judge had also found that there had been control “on a wider basis than… exercising quality control”.  However, their Honours held that this was not the case because “the application of the mark to a slab is not indicative of control over the designated goods” [9] and the various claims of wider control, such as Caesarstone’s website listing ideas on possible uses for the slabs did not “operate to constrain or demand the stonemasons to use the slabs in any particular way or require fabrication in any particular way” [10].  Further, the general communications between Caesarstone and its distributors did not include reporting back to Caesarstone on the ultimate application of the slabs and did not “translate into a finding of “control” over the designated goods”.  [11]

Decision

Their honours found that the primary judge erred in concluding that there had been honest concurrent use in respect of the goods covered by the amended application. They also found the claimed use was not authorised use under Caesarstone’s control and that Caesarstone did not exercise quality control and general control on a wider basis.

The second proceeding was resolved in the same way as the first and third proceeding also went the same way as the first.

The appeals in all three proceedings were allowed, the primary judge’s orders were set aside, Ceasarstone’s application numbers 1058321 and 1211153 were refused and registration number 1211152 was cancelled.

Takeaway

The decision is an important reminder that quality control must be exercised as a matter of substance. This is essential if the use of the trade mark is to be considered authorised use that can be relied upon by a registered owner for the purposes of defending a non-use removal action, or to support an applicant’s claim to registration based on use.

It serves as useful clarification that disclaimers in goods specifications are to be interpreted as a matter of plain English and is a reminder that to establish “honest concurrent use”, it is necessary to prove use on the goods covered by the application.


[1] Ceramiche Caesar S.p.A. V Caesarstone Ltd [2020] FCAFC 124 (28 July 2020), paragraph 22.

[2] Ibid, paragraph 27.

[3] Ibid, paragraph 29

[4] Ibid, paragraph 45.

[5] Ibid, paragraph 39.

[6] Ibid, paragraph 60.

[7] Ibid, paragraph 52.

[8] Ibid, paragraph 58.

[9] Ibid, paragraph 64.

[10] Ibid, paragraph 70.

[11] Ibid, paragraph 75.

Authored by Michelle Howe and Sean McManis

4 min read

The relatively new “bad faith” (section 62A) ground of opposition can be a strong basis for action against misappropriation of a trade mark owners’ goodwill, where the more commonly used grounds of deceptive similarity with an earlier mark (section 44) and likelihood of confusion due to reputation in an earlier mark (section 60) would fail.

Recent Trade Marks Office decisions illustrate some types of exploitative conduct that can give rise to a finding of “bad faith”.

The issue

The key issue in all cases was whether Southcorp Brands Pty Ltd (SCB) met its onus of demonstrating that the applicant had acted in “bad faith” in filing its trade mark application.

Bad faith has been described in the following way:

“… mere negligence, incompetence or a lack of prudence to reasonable and experienced standards would not, in themselves, suffice, as the concept of bad faith imports conduct which, irrespective of the form it takes, is of an unscrupulous, underhand or unconscientious character

(Fry Consulting Pty Ltd v Sports Warehouse (No 2) (2012) 201 FCR 565)

The Cases

SCB’s well known Penfolds” mark

SCB is a subsidiary of Treasury Wines Estate (TWE) Limited and produces wines under various well known marks, including “Penfolds”.

SCB filed evidence of the extensive reputation and promotion of its “Penfolds” wines, which have been in existence since 1844, and are labelled with the trade mark “Penfolds” in plain script or in red cursive script.

In each opposition case below, the applicant had applied to register its mark/s in relation to wines and other alcoholic beverages.

Facts in each case

Oppositions to “Barry Ford and “Ben Ford”
(Southcorp Brands Pty Limited v Li Li Shen [2019] ATMO 42 (26 March 2019)

SCB’s “Penfolds” Label

SCB filed evidence of use of the Chinese Characters  in relation to its “Penfolds” wines sold in China. Those characters are transliterated to “Ben Fu” – the Chinese phonetic approximation of “Penfolds”.  SCB also owns Australian registrations for its  and “Ben Fu” trade marks.

The applicant had repeatedly used its mark “Barry Ford” in red cursive font (similar to SCB’s font) combined with SCB’s  mark on its wine labels.  SCB also submitted evidence that the applicant had used trade dress similar to SCB’s, such as a red capsule attached to the bottle neck, red cursive font against a white label and the use of “BIN” to indicate wine vintages.

Prior to the date of filing, the Beijing High People’s Court had issued a decision regarding an application by SCB to remove one of the applicant’s Chinese trade mark registrations for non-use.  In that decision the Court recognised that the Chinese Characters   would be seen as identifying SCB’s wines.  The applicant was therefore clearly aware of SCB and its trade mark rights and reputation at the date of filing its application.

Opposition to “MAISON RICH”
(Southcorp Brands Pty Limited v BIN-VIN (Shanghai) Trading Co. Ltd [2020] ATMO 27 (24 February 2020)

The English translation of SCB’s Chinese Character version of the “Penfolds” mark is “Rush Rich”.  SCB was the owner of the trade mark MAISON DE GRAND ESPRIT.

The applicant’s mark combined the word “MAISON” with the word “RICH” – being the second word in the English translation of SCB’s Chinese Character version of “Penfolds”.

The applicant was part of a corporate group, with shared ownership and directors, which had applied to register various marks similar to SCB’s marks in the names of different, but related, entities.  SCB had opposed numerous applications filed by entities within the group and rather than defending those oppositions, new applications had been filed for additional marks similar to SCB’s in the name of different related entities.

Entities within the group had also been the subject of judgements in the Federal Court in Australia and the Shanghai Pudong District People’s Court for infringement of SCB’s marks or engaging in unfair competition through the making of false allegations. See for example Southcorp Brands Pty Ltd v Australia Rush Rich Winery Pty Ltd [2019] FCA 720 (3 May 2019) for the finding of infringement by some of the entities within the applicant’s group.

Again, the applicant was therefore clearly aware of SCB and its trade mark rights and reputation at the date it applied for “MAISON RICH”.

Opposition to mark


(Southcorp Brands Pty Ltd v Shanghai Benka Wines Co., Ltd [2020] ATMO 9 (29 January 2020)

The applicant had sought registration of various marks identical or similar to SCB’s marks in China and Australia, and one application in China had been opposed by the Opponent well before the filing date.

It had also produced wine labelling copying SCB’s trade dress by using similar script stylisation and colour schemes.

The applicant had also used a different company name for filing the Australian application to the name it had used to file the earlier Chinese applications which had been opposed by SCB. SCB argued (successfully) that this was intended “to obscure its true identity in order to prevent detection of its activity in Australia”.

Findings

In all three cases the Hearing Officer decided that each applicant was aware of the reputation in SCB’s “Penfolds” marks at the time of filing their application.  The pattern of behaviour in each case, such as adopting similar trade dress and trade mark stylisation to that used by SCB and applying for identical or similar marks to SCB’s in Australia and China in related company names, was found indicative of a desire to exploit SCB’s trade marks and reputation and to convey an association, affiliation or endorsement by SCB that did not exist.

The Hearing Officer found that the behaviour in each case fell short of the standards of acceptable commercial behaviour observed by reasonable and experienced persons and constituted “bad faith”.\

Authored by Michelle Howe and Sean McManis